AGA Roll Call: Dear Me

AGA Roll Call: Dear Me

Dear Me,

I have putting writing this letter off for a long time, but it has never been far from my mind every time I come to post a blog entry. I think most of that is that I am finally coming to terms with the fact that in ten years time I probably will be around to read this letter, which only a few months ago was a hope that I couldn’t quite grasp hold of, and now it seems a lot more realistic.

In a couple of months I am getting out of here and moving to Canada for a year (at this stage) to start a new life. Right now I don’t feel like I am leaving much behind that I will miss, aside from a few people who I hope I will keep in touch with. A while ago now, Heather told me that as you grow older you start to make your own family, from people you really care about and who care about and are invested in you. I have started that process only recently, and I do hope that as I read this ten years from now I do have those people in my life, even if they are few, and I hope that I am one of those people in someone else’s life.

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AGA Roll Call: Dear Me

I had the absolute delight, during this year's Seattle International Film Festival, of seeing an amazing film, writer/director Lynn Shelton's "We Go Way Back."

In the film, the lead character Kate, a woman in her twenties, is confronted with her 13-year-old self via letters she had written back then to her older self, one for every upcoming birthday.

On the website for the film, Shelton says: "I once heard a writer refer to the 20’s as a woman’s “geisha years”. Feeling a little lost, she seeks direction from those around her and expends enormous amounts of energy fulfilling the needs of everyone but herself—particularly men. I certainly went through this phase in my own life and what breaks my heart about it is that it was not a lack self-direction and self-respect but rather a loss. At thirteen, I possessed a clarity of vision and a degree of self-confidence that I marvel at today. Somehow, the experience of adolescence stole it all away and it took me years—decades, really—to get it back again.

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